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Mistletoe Treats Intestinal Cancer

Mistletoe Treats Intestinal Cancer

Mistletoe Treats Intestinal Cancer

Australian researchers believe that white mistletoe, a symbol of Christmas in the West, can form the basis of an alternative method of treating colon cancer.

Scientists from the University of Adelaide compared three different mistletoe extracts that were tested on intestinal cancer cells. Chemotherapy preparations and extracts were also tested on healthy cells.

It turned out that one of the extracts (type Fraxini) effectively fought cancer cells and did not show such activity towards healthy ones. Experts found that the effectiveness was even higher than that of the drugs used in chemotherapy.

The experts concluded that certain concentrations of the extract can significantly reduce the survival of cancer cells.

Moreover, only Fraxini did not seriously harm healthy cell cultures. For final conclusions, additional research is needed, the researchers said.